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Trident

The student news site of Corona del Mar High School

Trident

The student news site of Corona del Mar High School

Trident

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The Art of Who We Are: A Reflection AP Art History Field Trip to The Getty Museum

Photo+of+The+Getty+Museum+Reflection+Pool+courtesy+of+Jessica+Miramadi+%28%E2%80%9824%29
Photo of The Getty Museum Reflection Pool courtesy of Jessica Miramadi (‘24)
There are few things that have been around since the beginning of time: atoms, men with pointy sticks, and art. As early agricultural methods progressed through the Neolithic period, common past times became prevalent among society and art grew significantly as a field of interest. Artists viewed their works as forms of expression, understanding of cumulative ideas, or even utilitarian purposes as cities established their foundations and economic circumstances proved prosperous.
Last Sunday, November 5th, a collective of AP Art History students traveled up to Malibu along with their teacher Mrs. Valdes-Ball to witness worldly preserved artworks and sculptures and gain a greater understanding of art beyond the digital screen. Upon discussion, she mentions that through appreciation for art and its roots, “there’s a lot of things that we can learn from the past” further elucidating that “ultimately people will make art to be shared… [so] art is an expression of their ideas, it’s an expression of their feelings, it’s something very visceral for humans”. As art has been passed down through generations, it holds the capability of telling stories of the past with few words ever spoken– and a broader perspective. Many feel that being able to experience this moment, of awe-inspiring pieces appearing before their eyes, allowed them to connect to it on a ground much deeper than before. Whether it was scale, ability to focus more on hidden detail, or even self-reflection, students were “having this really special experience that is maybe a little more precious than being in a classroom, learning about the object” (Valdes-Ball).
In addition to all previously stated, AP Art History student and senior Hannah Young notes her fascination with viewing the abundance of artworks on display, “there have been so many people who have led so many lives that have contributed to this piece, being here in a place where we can see it and it is still preserved”. Through time, many of the world’s most notable and significant creations have been lost, destroyed, concealed, or stolen. Standing against the aches of history, in storms or raids, religious fervor or revenge, a lot of the history known today has been tarnished. Some artifacts shattered, set ablaze, or tagged have also taken part in preventing the world from gaining a full understanding of what is now forgotten cultures lying in ancestry. Young, along with many other students, were found infatuated with all that had been maintained since their origins and astounded with being able to stand amongst some of the works others could only dream of seeing. In accordance, art enthusiast and senior Lexie Popper speculates that “there’s something special about being in a room with something that has existed for so long and seen so many different places and lives, even just how it was made– so much went into that”.
In art, a common misconception is that there is a truth to a piece’s meaning– and that may be the case– but it typically is misconstrued that the truth must be specific to all individuals. Expanding on this idea, Popper ponders, “One of the most important things to remember is that art as a whole— music, literature, painting, etc– they’re all subject to our own interpretation”. Art is ubiquitous in society, but that is because it has a versatility that allows it to be subjective. And many must remember, a piece of art is the audience who gazes upon it.
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