Cross Country End of Season Banquet

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Cross Country End of Season Banquet

Claire Qiu, Journalist

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Floral centerpieces, running merchandise in blue and white, and holiday lights set the mood for the annual CdM cross country end of season banquet. Runners across all levels gathered at 6:30, dressed in their very best, to celebrate the end of a successful season with food, awards from the coaches, and speeches made by graduating seniors. A slideshow of photos from meets, races, and practices ran on the background, setting the mood for a fun gathering.

After an hour or so of talking, eating, and laughing, distinguished head coach Bill Sumner gave a speech reflecting on the past season, and what to look ahead to. He closed his speech with this profound remark: “There are two kinds of people in this world, just like there are two kinds of runners. There are those who tell you what they are going to do, and then they do it. And then there are those that tell you what they are going to do, and then do just enough to get by.” These were wise words from an experienced coach all the runners look up to.

Following his speech, awards were given out to runners who had truly distinguished themselves. Those included awards for the most improved runner, an award based on the pure mathematical calculation of how much time had been cut from one’s race time, and the MVP, decided by the coaches, and fortunately not a runner-friendly democratic affair. Recipients included senior Maya Buchwald, sophomore Claire Qiu, senior Nico Pence, and sophomore Vlad Marinescu.

The ceremonies were closed with speeches from the graduating seniors. Among the most memorable were Austin Leehealey’s rambling introduction of the entire boys’ team, complete with mysterious references to inside jokes among them, that followed a dramatic deviation from his originally planned speech, and Buchwald’s well-written, if slightly humorous and dry, ode to the joys of running cross country. “It may not seem like it at first,” said Buchwald, “but even though cross country sucks ninety-five percent of the time, you should really consider not quitting. It will all be worth it in the end.”