California’s Deadly Wildfires

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California’s Deadly Wildfires

Emma Joyce, Journalist

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2018 has been one of the deadliest and destructive wildfire season in California history. The fires have swept through California, leaving cities and towns ablaze, and families without homes.  People are sent running, seeking shelter from the fast moving fire, clinging to their babies and pets in their arms. The Cal fire team and local officials recorded two major fires in Northern and Southern California.
In Northern California, the “Camp Fire” has burned 148,000 acres of land and destroyed 11,862 structures (including homes).  The fire is only 55% contained and is expected to continue for much longer. The smoke from the fires has also caused Northern California to reach worst air quality in the world, surpassing regions in India and China. People in the area must deal with heavy smoke and hazardous air pollution. As of now, 71 fatalities have been confirmed, and the number of missing people has risen to 1,011.
The “Woolsey Fire”, located in Southern California in Los Angeles and Ventura county, has reached containment of 82%. 57,000 homes are in danger of being destroyed, with 713 already burned to the ground. Three deaths have been recorded, with many more missing.  Frustrated citizens described to news stations that they were confused about whether or not they could enter their neighborhoods. One resident Malibu told CBS, “”It’s pretty frustrating considering they didn’t tell us there’s going to be a hard closure, and we’ve been going back and forth all day. And all of a sudden, they just, slam, I even left something on the stove.”
The fires have swept through California, leaving cities and towns ablaze. With no hope in sight, it has been a miserable experience for those who have lost their homes, or loved ones.
The Los Angeles County fire Inspector Sam Padilla stated, “You do not expect something to stretch our resources to this magnitude… to try and staff something this big, you cannot predict it.”